Posts tagged with: release


4.6.2019

Upcoming releases with Automation workbench

In this post, we will discuss a bit about our upcoming release schedule and offer a glimpse to the features in upcoming releases.

 

Challenges with test automation

Business challenges related to interpreting results of automated tests are obvious. More often, tests are created by developers with various different motives, the number of tests is often numerous and traceability to the specification is often lacking. Features are needed to make sense of these results and gain the business benefits outside the scope of regression or smoke testing – which in practice, often tends to be the use for automated tests.

If you are able to map and scope the tests efficiently, you

  1. have a better understanding of what is currently passing or failing in your system under testing,
  2. have your team collaborate better,
  3. ensure that key parties in your project can make educated decisions instead of being reactive and
  4. have a tool to really transition from manual to automated testing as existing test plans can be easily automated by mapping automated tests to existing test cases.

 

Automation in Testlab

In Testlab, results from automated tests can be mapped to test cases in your project. This way of working with your automated tests has benefits as the results can be tracked and reported in exactly the same way as the manual tests in your current test plan. What happens is that when results for automated tests are received (for example from a Jenkins’ job), a test run is added with the mapped test cases holding the appropriate results. The logic how the mapping works is currently fixed so that the test cases can be mapped with pre-defined fixed logic: If the ID of the automated test starts with an ID bound to a test case, it will receive results of this automated test.

 

Upcoming Automation workbench

Future versions of Testlab will include a new Test automation view with a workbench aimed at managing the import and mapping of your automated tests. A screenshot of the current prototype can be seen below (click for a peek):

Issue situation radiator

 

The workbench

  • allows you to define “sources” for your tests: a source is a new concept which allows you to configure how the incoming results from such source are handled. You might want to think the source as your “Jenkins job” or your Jenkins installation as a whole if your jobs follow the same semantics and practices. A source is defined with “rules”, which define how the automated tests are mapped. The workbench
  • features a rule engine, which will allow comprehensive mapping rules to be defined with
    • ignores (which tests are ignored),
    • creation rules (how test cases for tests are automatically created) and
    • mapping rules (such as “starts-with”, “ends-with”, regular expressions – defines how the results for the tests are mapped to your test plan) and
  • the workbench allows you to
    • easily upload new results by dragging and dropping,
    • execute any rules as a dry run to see how the results would be mapped before the actual import,
    • create any test cases by hand – if preferred over the creation rules – and
    • use pre-built wizards which help you to easily create the needed rules by suggesting appropriate rules for your source.

We feel this is an unique concept in industry to help you get better visibility in your automation efforts.

The prototype shown is work-in-progress and is due to be changed before release.

 

Upcoming releases

As our roadmap implies, The new major automation related features are planned to be released in Q3 of our 2019 release cycle. The team will be hard working with these new features which means that the Q2 release will be a bug-fix release only. That said, we will be releasing maintenance releases in between, but the next feature release will be the version with automation features in Q3/2019.

Meliora Testlab Team

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Tags for this post: automation features integration product release usage 


11.4.2019

Testlab – Lost Cosmonaut release

The Meliora team is proud to announce a new version of Meliora Testlab codenamed Lost Cosmonaut. A major addition in this release is the new radiator for real-time tracking of your issues. In this version, you also might see a speed boost due to a new server protocol between the UI and the server. Read more about the changes below.

 

Issue situation radiator
Issue situation radiator

Radiators are a new reporting related concept introduced in the earlier release to view your project situation in always up-to-date view. Lost Cosmonaut features a new ‘Issue situation’ radiator to give you a fast glance at how the issues in your project are currently being handled.

The radiator provides multiple different statistics to help you improve your issue handling work and to identify possible bottlenecks in your processes. A more detailed description of what statistics the radiator provides and how the radiator should be configured can be found in the help manual of Testlab.

 

Saveable table views

In earlier versions of Testlab you had the opportunity to save the current filters in your table views. Lost Cosmonaut improves this by introducing table views.

In addition to filters, the function now saves the whole configuration of your table including the visible columns, column widths, sorting and grouping settings. You also have an option to reset the view back to the original settings. Keep in mind though that when resetting the view you lose all your current settings in the table.

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Show non-inactive” assets in trees

A new control “Show non-inactive” has been implemented to trees representing test cases and requirements. By default, this checkbox is unchecked which hides all deprecated assets from the tree. To show all deprecated assets, check the control.

Keep in mind that this option also controls if the deprecated assets are shown in the appropriate table views (test cases or requirements). This control makes it easier to hide and show the deprecated assets without the need for using the status related filters to achieve the same.

 

Performance improvements via a new server protocol

A new server protocol long in the making is introduced which the UI uses to transfer data from the server. This should bring performance improvements and make the UI snappier in most places. Keep in mind though, that the speedups gained depend highly on the amount of data in your project, on the browser used and on the speed of your network connection.  

 

In addition to the above

In addition to numerous smaller changes and the major ones above,

  • Milestones view has been added with “Hide completed” checkbox to hide the already completed milestones,
  • milestones have been added a new start date field (currently an informative field used only in radiators),
  • asset tagging has been improved by adding a new “tag.manage” permission to control who can add completely new tags and remove existing tags completely,
  • during testing, when a new issue is added instead of only failed steps of test case, all steps are included the description of the issue,
  • by using the search field in the top right toolbar you can now search for test cases verifying specific requirements (“verifying:REQ”) and
  • if the “unique ID” of test cases has been configured to be visible in the project, the ID is automatically shown in the views related to the execution of tests.

 

Thanking you for all your feedback,

Meliora team


Lost Cosmonaut

Yuri Gagarin became the first man in space in 1961. This was an irrefutable major feat for whole humankind. But at what price?

During the so-called Space Race, between 1955 and 1972, both the Soviet Union and the United States competed on which of these parties would be the first to conquer space. As said, on April 12, 1961, was the first recognized successful space flight made with a person onboard. But theories exist saying that there many incidents in space programs that were kept secret, especially in the Soviet Union’s space program. These theories spark from the recordings made by amateur radio operators featuring cosmonauts on failed space missions before Gagarin.

(Source: HowStuffWorks, Wikipedia, illustration from Open Clip Art Library / public domain)

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1.2.2019

Official support for Jenkins Pipelines

A continuous delivery pipeline is an automated process for delivering your software to your customers. It is the expression of steps which need to be taken to build your software from your version control system to a working and deployed state.

In Jenkins, Pipeline (with a capital P), provides a set of tools for modeling simple and complex pipelines as a domain-specific language (DSL) syntax. Most often this pipeline “script” is written and stored to a Jenkinsfile stored inside your version control system. This way the actual Pipeline definition can be kept up-to-date when the actual software evolves. That said, Pipeline scripts can also be stored as they are to Pipeline-typed jobs in your Jenkins.

 

Meliora Testlab plugin for your Pipelines

Meliora provides a plugin to Jenkins which allows you to easily publish your automated testing results to your Testlab project.

Previously, it was possible to use the plugin in Pipeline scripts by wrapping the plugin to a traditional Jenkins job and triggering it with a “build” step. A new version 1.16 of the plugin has been released with official support for using the plugin in Pipeline scripts. This way, the plugin can be directly used in your scripts with a ‘melioraTestlab’ expression.

When the plugin is configured as traditional post-build action in a Jenkins job, the plugin settings are set by configuring the job and entering the appropriate setting values via the web UI. In Pipelines, the settings are included as parameters to the step keyword.

 

Simple Pipeline script example

The script below is an example of a simple Declarative Pipeline script with Meliora Testlab plugin configured in a minimal manner.

pipeline {
    agent any
    stages {
        stage('Build') {
            // ...
        }
        stage('Test') {
            // ...
        }
        stage('Deploy') {
            // ...
        }
     }
     post {
         always {
             junit '**/build/test-results/**/*.xml'
             melioraTestlab(
                 projectKey: 'PRJX',
                 testRunTitle: 'Automated tests',
                 advancedSettings: [
                     companyId: 'mycompanyid',
                     apiKey: hudson.util.Secret.fromString('verysecretapikey'),
                     testCaseMappingField: 'Test class'
                 ] 
             )
         }
     }
}

The script builds, tests, deploys (with the steps omitted) the software and always as post stage, publishes the generated test results and sends them to your PJRX project in Testlab by storing them in a test run titled ‘Automated tests’. Note that advanced settings block is optional: If you configure these values to the global settings in Jenkins, the plugin can use the global settings instead of the values set in the scripts.

 

Pipeline script example with all settings present

The example below holds all parameters supported (at the time of writing) by the melioraTestlab step.

pipeline {
    agent any
    stages {
        // ...
    }
    post {
        always {
            junit '**/build/test-results/**/*.xml'
            melioraTestlab(
                projectKey: 'PRJX',
                testRunTitle: 'Automated tests',
                comment: 'Jenkins build: ${BUILD_FULL_DISPLAY_NAME} ${BUILD_RESULT}, ${BUILD_URL}',
                milestone: 'M1',
                testTargetTitle: 'Version 1.0',
                testEnvironmentTitle: 'integration-env',
                tags: 'jenkins nightly',
                parameters: 'BROWSER, USERNAME',
                issuesSettings: [
                    mergeAsSingleIssue: true,
                    reopenExisting: true,
                    assignToUser: 'agentsmith'
                ],
                importTestCases: [
                    importTestCasesRootCategory: 'Imported/Jenkins'
                ],
                publishTap: [
                    tapTestsAsSteps: true,
                    tapFileNameInIdentifier: true,
                    tapTestNumberInIdentifier: false,
                    tapMappingPrefix: 'tap-'
                ],
                publishRobot: [
                    robotOutput: '**/output.xml',
                    robotCatenateParentKeywords: true
                ],
                advancedSettings: [
                    companyId: 'mycompanyid', // your companyId in SaaS/hosted service
                    apiKey: hudson.util.Secret.fromString('verysecretapikey'),
                    testCaseMappingField: 'Test class',
                    usingonpremise: [
                        // optional, use only for on-premise installations
                        onpremiseurl: 'http://testcompany:8080/'
                    ]
                ]
            )
        }
    }
}

If you wish to familiarize yourself to the meaning of each setting, please refer to the plugin documentation at https://plugins.jenkins.io/meliora-testlab.

 

(Pipeline image from Jenkins.io – CC BY.SA 4.0 license)

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Tags for this post: automation best practices features jenkins plugin release usage 


10.1.2019

Testlab – Plumbbob release

New year, a new version of Testlab. We are glad to announce a new version of Meliora Testlab – Plumbbob. This release includes multiple new features including Radiators. A Radiator is a new reporting related concept which aims to help you track the progress of your testing in real-time. Please read more about the new features and changes in this release below.

 

Restricting the visibility of assets
Radiators

Radiators – a new reporting related concept introduced in this release – are real-time views to your project data refreshed at frequent intervals. Radiators differ from regular reports in a sense that the regular reports are intended to be ‘printed on paper’ as radiators are intended for real-time tracking from a display screen.

A typical usage scenario for a radiator is a so-called feedback display your team might have in their break room.  Plumbbob release includes two radiators:

  • Testing feedback radiator, which shows the current situation of issues and testing in progress.
  • Multi-radiator, which allows you to configure multiple (single-)radiators to be shown in regular intervals.

More radiators for specific tracking purposes are to be added in future releases.

Note: A Radiator is protected by a password which is needed to display it. Opening up a radiator (or multiple radiators from a single browser) consumes a single license from your license pool. For the time being, Radiators are also usable in Self-service subscriptions – so feel free to try them out! 

 

Coverage filtering

Test coverage view has been added with a search-word based filtering function which can be used to filter in relevant data to the coverage grid. The filtering itself works similarly as it works in the requirement or test case trees. For example, in Test case coverage, filtering with “priority:high” filters in coverage only for “high” prioritized test cases.

 

Grid context menus

Most grids presenting data have row-specific controls which are represented by small buttons shown at the end of the row when the mouse cursor hovers on the row. In Plumbbob, you can also access these functions via a context menu which is shown when you click the right mouse button on the row.

 

 

Special pasting

When managing test cases you can copy test cases around in your project using the left-hand side test case tree. The tree has been added with a “Paste special…” functionality, which enables you to select the content copied for selected test cases. For test cases, you have an option to choose if you want to copy the steps, attached files, linked requirements and optionally, copy the test cases by retaining their workflows status instead of copying the test cases to “In design” status.

 

Assigning tests to individuals

To ease managing your testing, test cases in test runs can now be assigned to individual testers. When a test case to be run is assigned to a tester, Testlab automatically selects these test cases for testing when this tester continues his/hers testing.

 

Categorized project events

When your team works in Testlab events are shown in the top right corner of the UI. In Plumbbob, you have an option to hide these event messages but at the same time, go through them at the later time. All events received are stored and categorized behind a red indicator. When clicked, you can read through them and/or dismiss them permanently.

 

In addition to the above

In addition to numerous smaller changes and the major ones above,

  • test case tree can now be filtered with requirements the test cases are currently verifying. Using search word such as “verifying:something” brings up test cases which are verifying matching requirements by searching requirements’ name and ID,
  • in Test execution, it is now easy to run test cases still not approved as ready. Running these test cases requires appropriate permissions (permissions to run test cases and to change the test case status to ready),
  • reports, which allow you to choose the fields listed, now don’t render the listings at all if no fields are selected,
  • data imports – such as test cases, requirements, … – now add timeline events to the dashboard and
  • most grids and reports now have an option to filter in assets by defining “Milestone: No milestone” criteria.

 

Thanking you for all your feedback,

Meliora team


Canis Majoris

At the Nevada test site, in the mid 1957s, United States conducted the biggest and longest series of nuclear tests ever in the continent. The operation was called Operation Plumbbob.

The scientists were worried about the radiation spills to the atmosphere. To go around this issue the Operation consisted of nuclear blasts conducted underground, in deep boreholes. These were to become the world’s first underground nuclear tests.

In a test codenamed Pascal B, the team experimented on how the air pressure affects the explosion and radiation spread. The borehole was welded shut with a 900 kilogram (2000 lb) steel cap. Then the a-bomb at the bottom of the shaft was detonated.

The steel cap over the detonation was blasted off at a speed of more than 240 000 kilometers per hour (66 km/s, 41 mi/s, 150 000 mph) which has been the topic of some discussion later on. As the cap was never found, it has been speculated that as the cap easily exceeded the escape velocity of the Earth, the cap (or part of it) would be the first manmade object to orbit the Earth. This would beat the Sputnik launched in October 1957.  

(Source: The Register, Wikipedia, photo by National Nuclear Security Administration / Nevada Site Office (Public Domain))

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28.9.2018

Testlab – Circleville release

We’ve released a new version of Meliora Testlab – Circleville. Please read more about the new features and changes in this release below.

 

Restricting the visibility of assets
Choosing fields to be reported

In Circleville, when rendering reports, you have an option to choose the fields you wish to include on your report. This applies to most reports which feature a table or listing of some kind. In previous versions, the report templates included listings with a pre-defined set of fields present.

When choosing the fields you also have an option to arrange the fields to the order desired. The fields and the corresponding order of them are saved as you configure your report.

 

Configurable requirement classes

You now have an option to configure your own classes for requirements, if needed. When you configure one, you enter a title and choose an icon for it. This information is used to present the requirements in the UI. The classes can also be used in reporting.

By using customized classes you have an option to choose the custom fields which are specific to each class. See below.

 

Different custom fields for different types of assets

When configuring custom fields you now have an option to choose which type of issue or which class of requirement the field applies to. This way, for example for issues, you can have a different set of fields for “defects” and different set of fields for “new features”. As said above, this applies to different classes of requirements too.

 

Help manual with inbuilt search

The help manual incorporated to Testlab now has a searching function inbuilt. Searching the manual is easy: Just enter a search term to the field in the lower left-hand corner. The contents index of the manual gets highlighted for pages with hits and in addition, the current help page open gets highlighted with yellow for any possible hits.

 

In addition to the above
  • Workflow changes: Deprecated assets such as deprecated requirements or test cases cannot be edited anymore. To edit them, use appropriate action to transfer the deprecated assets back to design.
  • Workflow changes: By default, closed issues cannot be edited anymore. To edit closed issues a new permission “defect.edit.closed” must be granted to the user.
  • When test cases in a test set of Planning view are hovered on, the details of test cases are presented in a tooltip.
  • Table views of requirements and test cases now show the number of assets presented.
  • Links to open issues in Testlab can now be formatted to include the issue ID instead of the primary key.
  • Reporting: “List of issues” and “Issue grouping” report templates now support a new field “Requirements” which allows you to report the requirements linked to the issues via the test cases the issues are linked with.

 

Thanking you for all your feedback,

Meliora team


Canis Majoris

A small town in Ohio US, Circleville, is best-known today as the host of the Circleville Pumpkin Show held to celebrate local agriculture since 1903. This picturesque town has a sinister history of its own, though.

A mystery still unsolved spans from sometime in 1976 to late 90s when local residents started receiving personal and threatening letters with details of their personal life included. Thousands of these letters, called Circleville Letters, were sent to citizens and local city officials. The letters were written in block letters and were sent by an anonymous sender.

Finally, a man thought to be responsible for the letters was apprehended on a case related to few recipients of these letters. He was found guilty for an attempted murder and sentenced for years in prison. 

The letters kept on coming, though. The officials put the man under solitary confinement which did not stop the letters and they were certain that this man could not be sending the letters. A lot later, even a team of television producers working on a television document received one. The letters kept on coming till the late 90s and suddenly stopped. 

(Source: Gizmodo, Reddit, photo by Aaron Burden)

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9.7.2018

Testlab – Globster release

We’ve released a new version of Meliora Testlab – Globster. Please read more about the new features and changes in this release below.

 

Restricting the visibility of assets
Restricting the visibility of assets

Your projects can now be specified with rules which restrict the visibility of certain assets in your project. This can be applied for requirements, test cases and issues and applied against their workflow status or values in customized fields.

For an example: If you have a 3rd party users in your project for which you’d wish to hide a set of requirements in your project, you can define a rule which limits the visibility of these requirements only to your own users in a certain user role.

 

Restricting the visibility of customized fields

Similarly to the assets, for all custom fields, it is now possible to choose the user roles for which the fields are visible for. This makes it possible to hide some information from your assets from a certain group of users.

When the field is restricted for certain roles, only users in these roles have access to the information in this field. Please refer to the help manual of Testlab for more details on how the data is visible and/or hidden.

 

Rich-text custom field type

A new type of custom field has been added which enables you to add a field with long richly formatted text for your assets. This new type of field differs in logic from other custom fields in a way that all rich-text typed custom fields are always presented on a separate tabin the design view.

 

More custom fields

The maximum number of custom fiels per asset type has been increased from 10 to 150.

 

Updates to plugins

Jenkins-, Confluence-, and JIRA-plugins have been released with bugs fixed and minor enhancements. Please update accordingly.

 

In addition to the above
  • Run Tests in … option in test case menu now has a filtering picker for picking the test run the tests should be executed in.
  • Selecting a report to be viewed is now easier in the UI as the listing of reports is now configurable and easier to filter.
  • With Execution history tab in Test design view it is now possible to inspect combined execution history for all test case’s revisions.
  • Reports can now be generated also in Finnish language.

 

Thanking you for all your feedback,

Meliora team


Canis Majoris

A globster is an unidentified organic mass that washes up on the shoreline of an ocean or other body of water. The term was first coined by Ivan T. Sanderson for the so called Tasmanian carcass found in 1960.

Globsters may present such a puzzling appearance that their nature remains controversial even after being officially identified by scientists. Some globsters lack bones or other recognisable structures, while others may have bones, tentacles, flippers, eyes, or other features that can help narrow down the possible species. The picture on the right is the “St. Augustine Monster” that washed ashore near St. Augustine, Florida, in 1896. It was first said to be the remains of a gigantic octopus but in 1995 analysis it was concluded that the globster in question was a large mass of collagenous matrix of whale blubber, likely from a sperm whale. 

(Source: Wikipedia)

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13.4.2018

Testlab – Canis Majoris release

We’ve released a new version of Meliora Testlab – Canis Majoris. This version includes major additions to the REST interfaces of Testlab and several UI related enhancements. Please read more about the changes below.

 

REST API enhancements
REST API enhancements

The REST based integration API of Testlab has been enhanced with a number of new supported operations. With Canis Majoris, it is possible to add, update and remove

  • requirements,
  • test categories,
  • test cases and
  • issues.

Add operation maps to HTTP’s POST-method, update operation maps to PUT-method (and in addition, supports partial updates) and remove operation maps to DELETE-method. More thorough documentation for these operations can be found in your Testlab instance via the interactive API documentation (/api).

 

Test categories with fields

In previous versions of Testlab, test cases were categorized to simple folders with a name. In Canis Majoris, test categories have been enhanced to be full assets with

  • a rich-text description,
  • time stamps to track creation and updates,
  • a change history and
  • a possibility add comments on them.

 

In addition to the above
  • Date and time formats are now handled more gracefully in the user interface by respecting the browser sent locale.
  • Test cases of a requirement can now be easily executed by choosing “Run tests…” from
    • the tree of requirements or
    • from the table view of requirements.
  • Similarly, the test cases linked to a requirement can be easily added to a your work (test) set by choosing “Add to work set” from the table view of requirements.
  • Test case listing -report renders execution steps in an easy-to-read table.

 

Thanking you for all your feedback,

Meliora team


Canis Majoris

VY Canis Majoris (VY CMa) is one of the largest stars detected so far and is located 3900 light-years from Earth. The estimates on it’s size vary, but it is estimated to be 1400 to 2200 solar radii (distance from center of Sun to it’s photosphere).

The size of this object is difficult to comprehend. It would take 1100 years travelling in jet aircraft at 900km/hr to circle it once. Also, It would take over 7 000 000 000 (7 Billion) Suns or 7 000 000 000 000 000 (7 Quadrillion) Earths to fill VY Canis Majoris. There are also few videos on YouTube which try to explain the size for you. 

(Source: Wikipedia, A Sidewalk Astronomer blog)

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5.3.2018

How to: Migrate from TestLink to Meliora Testlab

transSome of our customers have moved from using TestLink to our tool, Meliora Testlab. We’ve been asked to make this transition easier and so we decided to document this migration path, and this  post here describes how the migration works. Basically the migration moves your important test data from TestLink to Testlab so you can continue to work in your new tool.

 

When changing the tool, do I need to change the way I work?

This is a tough subject that deserves another post completely dedicated to that matter. To put it shortly, Testlab offers a lot of features that allow working in new ways, but most of the Testlink features are also in Testlab, so if there is no need to alter your way of working, you can do most of your work in the same way as before. TestLink’s “Test specification” view’s data can be seen in Testlab in “Test case design”. Assigning test cases to be tested in the simple form in Testlab is done by picking the cases to work set and then creating a test run, which tells the what release / version is being tested. Test execution is again pretty much the same again.

In nutshell – how does this all work?

In TestLink there is an export feature that allows you to export your test case data as XML. We can transform this data in to a format that can be directly put in in to the Testlab. When custom fields have been used in Testlink, the tool needs to be instructed how the custom fields are mapped in to Testlab fields. After the definition, a click of a button transform the data in to desired format.

For your convenience, Meliora will do this transformation free of charge (*). For our On-premise customers we can also deliver the tool to allow doing the transformation yourself.

The migration has five distinct steps:

  1. Modifying the Testlab to used format. ( optional )
  2. Exporting Test cases from TestLink testsuites.
  3. Describing the data mappings ( optional )
  4. Transforming the TestLink Export XML to csv format that Testlab can read
  5. Importing the test case data from csv.

The techical part behind these steps is pretty straightforward. Once you know how you want to migrate the data, the export-import will be just a few clicks for you.

*) Meliora reserves rights to decline of the free service on cases where making the transformation would engage Meliora with exeptional workload. This could happen if you would have huge amount of projects to be migrated.

 

What do I need to do before the migration?

Well, the only required thing is becoming a Meliora customer. Any edition of Testlab will do. A very very recommended thing to do is to plan how do you want to test with Testlab in the future. As Testlab offers many features that make testing easier that are not present in Testlink, it might be wise to change the way how testing is done at the same time when the tool is being changed. For example testlab has automatic revisioning, history, built-in (optional) review etc. so you might have made customizations to TestLink for these issues. These customizations are probably not needed anymore, so you need to decide if it is better just to ditch the customizations or do you want to continue using them. If you are in a hurry, fear not! Then you can just import all custom data and ditch the unneeded later.

 

General considerations

Most important thing to ensure is that your company’s testing work is not interrupted more than it has to. When you switch the tool, it is not effective if you continue using the old tool ( in migrated projects ) as you would be getting test case updates in two tools and test results in two tools for same project. Thus it is best to decide a timeslot for the switch and ensure everything goes smoothly when the time comes.

It is best to contact Meliora as you plan the migration and prepare a timeslot in case you want to keep to switch time in absolute minimum. Just create a support ticket and Meliora will help you getting the migration done smoothly.

Migration steps

 

Modifying the Testlab

Testlab, by default, has different fields and field Values than TestLink. You can, if you want, do the migration without modifying Testlab. Then the fields are going to be mapped by default. In case you decide to do the modification, these are the things to consider:

Choosing / Modifying a workflow

workflow-editIn testlab, the way how statuses are used are controlled by workflows. Workflows allow logic behind changing statuses – what statuses can be reached from what status, what fields are mandatory in which state and who has privileges to make changes. Testlab comes with two default workflows, called “simple” and “review”. The difference for test cases here is that review has a phase for review, where simple skips this. Basically you need to decide what statuses you wish to see in Testlab. The default Status transformations are depicted in following table:

 

 

 

 

 

TestLink Status
Testlab Simple workflow
Testlab With review workflow
Draft In design In design
Ready for review Ready for review In design
Review in progress Ready for review In design
Rework In design In design
Obsolete Deprecated Deprecated
Future Ready Ready
Final Ready Ready

You can add additional data transformations for the migration in addition to simply changing statuses. For example the “Testlab way” for handling test cases that are not yet runnable, is using a “Milestone” field to define when the test case is planned to be used. More on this on chapter “Describing the data mappings”.

Modifying the Testlab project

In case you have used custom fields and wish to keep the data in the custom fields in the future as well, you need to configure your Testlab’s project to include those. You’ll find the instructions for that in Testlab’s manual – it’s very simple operation.

Keep in mind, that you also have an option to import data from custom fields to description field. This makes sense when you do not want to lose this information, but you do not need to filter data in reports using custom field data.

If you are migrating data to multiple Testlab projects you can do the common modifications once and then copy the project with modifications. This way you do not need to do the modifications for all the projects separately.

 

Exporting test cases from TestLinkTestlink export options

In Testlink, you need to export test cases as XML for each project you wish to migrate.

  • In Testlink, go to “Test specification”
  • Choose “Actions” -> Export All Test Suites
  • make sure you have at least four boxes checked
  • Save your XML export file

 

Describing the data mapping

Before the transforming the data you can define how the TestLink data is to be transformed in the migration. Our on-premise customers that wish to do the transformation themselces do not need to do this as they are going to put this data in to tool themselves. Send the following information  to Meliora:

  • What custom fields are to be migrated. For each field describe to what field you want to import the data in to.
    • Example1 ) TestLink custom field “risk” values to Testlab field “risk”
    • Example 2) TestLink custom field “legacy link” added to the end of “description” field
  • How you want to change the data values
    • Example 1) TestLink custom field “risk” value “petty” to be “Low” in Testlab
    • Example 2) TestLink status “Future” to Testlab status “In design” + Milestone to value “Future”
Transforming the XML to Testlab csv

Here you have a few options:

  1. For SaaS users you can just send the XML to Meliora, and Meliora will do the transformation and import the data to your Testlab project. Just wait for the confirmation and you can start using your Testlab with imported data!
  2. For On-premise / SaaS users that want Meliora to just do the transformation, send the XML to Meliora and Meliora will deliver you an CSV that is ready to be imported in to testlab.
  3. For On-Premise users that want to do the transformation themselves, contact Meliora for details. Meliora will deliver you the tool along with instructions to do the transformation.
Importing the data from csv

The import itself is just a few click really:

  1. From Testlab menu choose Import -> Test cases
  2. Choose the csv file
  3. Try the import first with “dry run” option on. This will show errors / warnings should there be any. Here you will see if, for example, if you do not have a custom field in this project where you try to input data with the csv file.
  4. After you are satisfied with dry run results, uncheck the dry run box to really load the data in to the Testlab.
  5. Refresh the test case tree and start using your Testlab.

Final words

This document describes the basic setup of the migration process. As with all project more complicated than Hello World!, there will be unknown factors. You might have in-house customization done to your TestLink or you might want to include data from completely another source. Fear Not! Meliora can work with migrations that does not follow the ordinary path. Just contact our great support and we will work trough the migration together!

Meliora team

 

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26.1.2018

Testlab – Helios release

A new version of Meliora Testlab – Helios – has been released. In this version, one of the goals was to optimize the speed of the user interface which makes this version of Testlab faster than ever. Please read more about the changes below.

 

Faster UI

Several enhancements have been made to optimize the UI, rendering and backend services. Some are workarounds to browser-related bugs, some are different rendering strategies and some are optimizations in situations where there are lots of assets in your project. 

We hope these changes make the use of Testlab snappier than ever. As the changes are browser-specific and may benefit some users more depending on the configuration of the workstation, we are more than happy to receive any feedback from you on your experiences.

 

Comments for test results
File attachments for steps of test cases

Previously, one could attach files to test cases. In Helios, you can also attach files to individual steps of the test case. The editor for editing steps has a new configurable column available for which you can attach any files relevant to the specific step.

The files are presented to the tester when the test case is in testing. The files are also included to reports and to e-mail messages sent for the test cases if preferred.

 

Expand attached images to listing reports

Requirements, test cases, and issues in Testlab can be attached with files. These files might be images, which is most common in case of issues where images such as screenshots are used to describe the issues encountered.

In Helios, the detailed listing reports (List of requirements, List of test cases and List of issues) have a new option to expand the attached images. This way, when the report is rendered, the images are expanded and shown in the printed report.

And there is more

In addition to the changes above:

  • SAML-authentication can be used to authenticate to web-published reports.
  • When hovering the assets in Testlab’s UI, the hovers now show also the files attached to the assets.
  • Help-browser window can now be resized and left open while using Testlab. As previously, you can also open up the help to separate browser tab.
  • API: The responses of REST API have been enhanced in a way that attached files are also included in responses. The related objects of assets also provide HAL-compatible links now for easier navigation in the response graph.
  • Concurrent editing and testing of test cases is now handled with better and more clear warning messages. 
 

Thanking you for all your feedback,

Meliora team


Helios 2

Helios 1 and Helios 2 are probes launched in 1974 and 1975 to study solar processes. They are no longer operational but remain in their orbits around the Sun.

The probes were once fastest man-made objects at 252 792 km/h (157 078 mph) – over 6 times around the earth in an hour. That is 70.22 kilometers per second. From London to New York in 79 seconds. On the other hand, it is only 586 times faster than the fastest production car Bugatti Veyron 16.4 Super Sport. For Helios 2, It would take 18028 years to reach Alpha Centauri, the nearest star system to the Sun. With Bugatti Veyron, it would take 10.5 million years. And while driving, you would have to fill the tank 459 900 000 000 times which equals 45 263 661 534 000 liters of gasoline. If we construct a cube as a gasoline tank for the fuel, we would need a cube that is approx. 3.6 kilometers per side.

(Source: Wikipedia)

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13.10.2017

Testlab – Parallax Denigrate release

We are proud to bring you a new version of Testlab – Parallax Denigrate – with usability-related features and risk analysis reporting.

 

Custom fields for projects
Targeted filtering of tree assets

Assets organized in tree structures, such as specification related assets (requirements, test cases, and test sets, can be filtered by a search field at the top of the tree control. This makes it easy to filter into the tree the assets which you are interested in.

This search field has been enhanced in a way which enables you to target the search better. For example, for test cases, filtering with

  • “priority:critical” shows all test cases prioritized as critical,
  • “name:plane tag:customer” shows all test cases with a word “plane” in the name of the test case and with a tag “customer”.

As said, this logic works with all trees in Testlab – including the pickers which are used to select assets related when editing. The UI has also been added with an easy help on the syntax as a tooltip.

 

Comments for test results
Risk analysis reporting

Often, the people responsible for the project are asked tough questions on the status of the project or product: How well is it tested? Can we go to production? Do you think the product is in a good enough for release? The manager must basically make an educated guess with the best possible information available – often from the data in the test management tool.

Testlab has been added with a Risk Analysis report which analyzes the requirements, test cases, and issues in the project and combines the information from risk view-point as a single report. The report includes

  • requirements not marked as covered, with failing or blocking tests or requirements not tested at all – grouped by requirement risk,
  • test cases not yet marked as ready, not passed or test cases which have not been tested at all – grouped by priority and
  • issues not yet resolved or closed – grouped by severity or priority.

As a combined single report, this report provides essential information for the manager to make his decision.

 

Issue-centric testing

Features have been added to support issue-centric testing better. Previously, issues in Testlab could be linked to a test case and a test run but in this new version of Testlab, it is possible to link multiple test cases (optionally via a test run as executed tests) to a single issue. The controls while editing the issue have been changed appropriately to make it easier to link an existing issue to a test case.

New functions have also been added to better utilize these links:

  • While running tests, you can now easily add the test cases linked to an issue as executable tests to your current run. To do this, click the “Add linked test cases to this run” control via the Issues tab while running tests.
  • While running a test, you can also add a link to an existing issue by clicking the “Link to current test case” control via the Issues tab.

Note: Due to this change the REST-API model has been updated. The old format is still supported for a single link but is due to be deprecated in future releases. Please see the documentation of DefectResource-endpoint in your Swagger instance (https://yourtestlab.melioratestlab.com/api).

 

Showing results in test case tree

The controls at the bottom of the test case tree are used to highlight the test cases with testing results. In previous versions of Testlab, the controls limited you to fetching the not passing results only. The controls were designed from the re-testing and regression testing point of view.

In Parallax Denigrate, these controls were changed in a way so that you have an option to simply filter in results for test cases from your preferred viewpoint (latest results in the project, results for a milestone, for a version or for a single test run). The actual change in the UI is that you also get the results for passed test cases. This makes these controls more flexible and the use of these controls is easier in different usage scenarios.

 

Better tree-pickers

The popup controls used to pick related assets are now much easier to use:

  • The pickers now feature the same searching feature introduced earlier (see “Targeted filtering of tree assets” above). This makes finding the asset from the tree much easier.
  • When picking assets, you have an option to add or remove the selected assets from the set of current values.

 

Reporting enhancements
  • The “Do not include sums of zero” option on the requirement, test case, issue and project grouping reports now filter out sums of zeroes from both axes (“Field to report” and “Group by”). Previously, the option filtered out sums of zeroes only from “Field to report” axis.
  • When old revisions (or otherwise deprecated assets) are included in reports, the assets are now highlighted with a gray color and also, the date when the asset was revised/deprecated is shown.
  • When reporting the latest results only on “Results of run tests” report, the report now also includes the test cases not yet run.
  • “Execution status of test cases” report has been added with two new options to customize the report’s behavior (“Test cases in test runs only” and “Result for latest revision”). Please see the inline tooltip helps for these two options on this report on the logic of these options.
 
Other miscellaneous changes
  • When editing a single issue, you can save the edits without closing the window by keeping Shift-key pressed.
  • When batch editing assets in the table view, top-right corner change event notifications are no longer generated to your teammates.
  • For deprecated test cases in the list of test cases in test execution view now includes the timestamp of the deprecation (when the test case was revised or when the test case was deprecated).
  • The state of “Show events” checkbox at the top right corner is now saved and remembered between sessions.
  • Copying and pasting with keyboard shortcuts now work as expected to step editor’s pre- and post-conditions.
 

Thanking you for all your feedback,

Meliora team


Bookhouse Boys

Usenet is a distributed discussion system which enables you to read and post messages, often termed as “news”, still existing but more popular back in the days. Usenet features newsgroups on various different topics and was a popular place for discussion.

In 1996, a series (hundreds) of unexplained word puzzles were posted to different newsgroups. The title for all these posts was “Markovian Parallax Denigrate” and each post contained a series of words which cryptographers and hackers have been trying to decipher – with little success. Some theories exist but the “Markovian Parallax Denigrate” has still been referred as “The Internet’s oldest and weirdest mystery”.

(Source: Wikipedia, The Daily Dot, Last (?) existing post in Google’s archive)

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